Posts by Königsbau

    Dieser Text aus der Washington Times ist schon etwas älter (13.Dezember 04), aber äußerst lesenswert und aussagekräftig. Besonders bezeichnende Aussagen sind hervorgehoben:



    In this first installment of a new series on Germany's identity crisis, UPI's religious affairs editor describes the agonizing in his hometown of Leipzig over whether to reconstruct a church destroyed by the Communists.


    By Uwe Siemon-Netto
    UPI Religious Affairs Editor


    Whenever I visit Leipzig, where I was born before the World War II but was unwelcome during four decades of Communism, I waver between irritation and bemusement about the way the local elites agonize over what seems only too natural. Foreigners, particularly those from Eastern Europe, share my bewilderment over this phenomenon, which strikes them as proof of Germany's enduring identity crisis.


    Here's the issue: Should Leipzig's late-Gothic university church be rebuilt? In my childhood this enchanting sanctuary graced the Augustusplatz, once one of Germany's largest and most beautiful squares, now arguably the ugliest.


    Called the Paulinerkirche, this former chapel of the Dominican order was the very icon of the ancient university, which will celebrate its 600th anniversary in 2009. Martin Luther personally consecrated it as a Protestant house of worship in 1543, and Bach preferred its organ to all others in this city that was his place of work for 27 years in the early 18th century.


    The Paulinerkirche survived the air raids of World War II almost undamaged. But after that war Leipzig had the misfortune of becoming part of Communist East Germany. Its chief of state and party boss, Walter Ulbricht, a son of Leipzig's red-light district, hated this symbol of his hometown's patrician, religious and academic traditions and ordered its destruction.


    So in 1968, before the eyes of tens of thousands of weeping spectators, the Paulinerkirche was blown up and later replaced by an excruciatingly unsightly administrative building, whose only ornament was - and still is - a monstrous bronze relief titled, "Karl Marx - the revolutionary and world-changing effect of his teaching."


    No sooner did the Communist regime collapse in 1989 than prominent Leipzigers and the city's admirers all over the world called for the church's reconstruction.


    As many as 27 Nobel laureates supported the friends of the Paulinerkirche movement; one of them, oncologist Guenter Blobel of New York, actually headed the association advocating the reconstruction for some time. Other supporters include Richard von Weizsaecker, Germany's former president.


    "If this were Poland, the church would have long been back in business," said Polish composer Krzysztoff Penderecki when he received an honorary doctorate from Leipzig University.


    But this isn't Poland. It is Germany struggling with its Nazi past, Germany whose chattering classes still seem under the illusion that by excelling in all things modern, lunacies included, and discarding all things old they might get rid of Hitler in the process.


    And so when the Christian Democrat-run state government of Saxony decided to rebuild the church, the intellectual elites were dismayed, indeed outraged. The university, insisting on its autonomy, maintained the government had no right to do such a thing since the church had been its property since the 16th-century Reformation.


    Its rector at the time of the government announcement resigned, saying what was really needed was a functional structure. And yet he was an avowed Christian.


    City Hall, too, was in an uproar, though quite unlike the local population, a majority of which sided with the international Nobel laureates. And the student body was divided. On the one hand, most of the Germans didn't want the church; on the other hand, a majority of the foreigners, notably the Eastern Europeans and Asians, thought their German classmates were nuts.


    "We felt to resurrect the church was the only right thing to do," said Tania, a recent Bulgarian graduate, as we stood in front of the Marx relief holding up the odious and thankfully moribund structure of concrete slabs that still stands where the church once stood.


    "What makes life here so infuriating is that Germans mindlessly reject the admirable parts of their history the rest of us admire so much. The controversy over the Paulinerkirche is a prime example for this idiocy."


    Even the state-related Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Saxony, guardian of Leipzig's rich theological traditions, showed little enthusiasm for the reconstruction. "This project is too ostentatious!" one senior pastor complained. "We with our history should be more modest."


    "When German Lutherans try their hands at modesty, I really become alarmed," retorted Tania with a laugh. "There is something ridiculously false about this kind of talk."


    But then, the university's 600th anniversary is looming. Until 2009 its shoddiest Communist-era buildings, which mar Leipzig's otherwise delightful city center, will have to be replaced, including the tall pile of concrete slabs held up by the Marx relief.


    Something attractive has to be put in its place; one way or another, Ulbricht's cultural crime must be atoned for.


    What is it to be? A chapel resembling the one Ulbnricht murdered? A secular venue of academic celebrations (which have lost all of their splendor anyway in "unostentatious" new Germany, where students receive their diplomas by mail or may pick them up during business hours in some gray office)?


    "If there had been a decision to rebuild the church, we would have received ample donations," said Ulrich Stoetzner, the current head of the Paulinerverein, an association promoting the reconstruction. "A reconstruction would have cost roughly 25 million Euros (about $33 million). But who wants to donate money for a profane hall?"


    A faithful copy of the Paulinerkirche, as it would have probably been erected in any nation with a firmer sense of identity - Poland, for example -- seems out of the question, even though 70 percent of the sanctuary's interior and its original plans have been preserved and the location of its rubble at Leipzig's outskirts is known.


    But there is a chance that a design by Dutch architect Erick van Egeraat might yet be realized. Earlier this year, a jury headed by Leipzig's city planner chose it over several competitors. It envisions an interior almost identical to the original to be used both for church divine service and academic and other functions.


    Its huge and elegantly gabled façade would not exactly replicate its predecessor but resemble it strongly in a stylized fashion. It would, in Christ-like manner, appear to reach out to neighboring university building, as if to embrace them, while still be dwarfed by the "wisdom tooth," as Leipzigers call the giant university skyscraper next door.


    ......


    It will be fascinating to see which party of Germans will prevail. Will it be the party of the functionalists who seem embarrassed by all of the nation's history, and especially its Christian history, which it is politically incorrect to credit?


    Or will it be a fledgling movement that would like Germans to remember that there was more to their history than Hitler?


    As composer Krzysztoff Penderecki said, "Such a debate would be unthinkable in Poland." But then, as we said, Leipzig is not in Poland, even though in their architectural glory days in the 18th century, Poland and Saxony had the same sovereign, King Augustus the Strong.


    The long and short of this story is that Leipzig lies in the heart of Germany, a nation infuriatingly busy with its masochistic struggle for identity, a struggle that looks more and more insincere with each passing generation.


    In the words of Tania, the Bulgarian graduate, it has "degenerated to a fig-leaf for mediocrity and bad taste."

    Dieser Text aus der Washington Times ist schon etwas älter (13.Dezember 04), aber äußerst lesenswert und aussagekräftig. Besonders bezeichnende Aussagen sind hervorgehoben:



    In this first installment of a new series on Germany's identity crisis, UPI's religious affairs editor describes the agonizing in his hometown of Leipzig over whether to reconstruct a church destroyed by the Communists.


    By Uwe Siemon-Netto
    UPI Religious Affairs Editor


    Whenever I visit Leipzig, where I was born before the World War II but was unwelcome during four decades of Communism, I waver between irritation and bemusement about the way the local elites agonize over what seems only too natural. Foreigners, particularly those from Eastern Europe, share my bewilderment over this phenomenon, which strikes them as proof of Germany's enduring identity crisis.


    Here's the issue: Should Leipzig's late-Gothic university church be rebuilt? In my childhood this enchanting sanctuary graced the Augustusplatz, once one of Germany's largest and most beautiful squares, now arguably the ugliest.


    Called the Paulinerkirche, this former chapel of the Dominican order was the very icon of the ancient university, which will celebrate its 600th anniversary in 2009. Martin Luther personally consecrated it as a Protestant house of worship in 1543, and Bach preferred its organ to all others in this city that was his place of work for 27 years in the early 18th century.


    The Paulinerkirche survived the air raids of World War II almost undamaged. But after that war Leipzig had the misfortune of becoming part of Communist East Germany. Its chief of state and party boss, Walter Ulbricht, a son of Leipzig's red-light district, hated this symbol of his hometown's patrician, religious and academic traditions and ordered its destruction.


    So in 1968, before the eyes of tens of thousands of weeping spectators, the Paulinerkirche was blown up and later replaced by an excruciatingly unsightly administrative building, whose only ornament was - and still is - a monstrous bronze relief titled, "Karl Marx - the revolutionary and world-changing effect of his teaching."


    No sooner did the Communist regime collapse in 1989 than prominent Leipzigers and the city's admirers all over the world called for the church's reconstruction.


    As many as 27 Nobel laureates supported the friends of the Paulinerkirche movement; one of them, oncologist Guenter Blobel of New York, actually headed the association advocating the reconstruction for some time. Other supporters include Richard von Weizsaecker, Germany's former president.


    "If this were Poland, the church would have long been back in business," said Polish composer Krzysztoff Penderecki when he received an honorary doctorate from Leipzig University.


    But this isn't Poland. It is Germany struggling with its Nazi past, Germany whose chattering classes still seem under the illusion that by excelling in all things modern, lunacies included, and discarding all things old they might get rid of Hitler in the process.


    And so when the Christian Democrat-run state government of Saxony decided to rebuild the church, the intellectual elites were dismayed, indeed outraged. The university, insisting on its autonomy, maintained the government had no right to do such a thing since the church had been its property since the 16th-century Reformation.


    Its rector at the time of the government announcement resigned, saying what was really needed was a functional structure. And yet he was an avowed Christian.


    City Hall, too, was in an uproar, though quite unlike the local population, a majority of which sided with the international Nobel laureates. And the student body was divided. On the one hand, most of the Germans didn't want the church; on the other hand, a majority of the foreigners, notably the Eastern Europeans and Asians, thought their German classmates were nuts.


    "We felt to resurrect the church was the only right thing to do," said Tania, a recent Bulgarian graduate, as we stood in front of the Marx relief holding up the odious and thankfully moribund structure of concrete slabs that still stands where the church once stood.


    "What makes life here so infuriating is that Germans mindlessly reject the admirable parts of their history the rest of us admire so much. The controversy over the Paulinerkirche is a prime example for this idiocy."


    Even the state-related Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Saxony, guardian of Leipzig's rich theological traditions, showed little enthusiasm for the reconstruction. "This project is too ostentatious!" one senior pastor complained. "We with our history should be more modest."


    "When German Lutherans try their hands at modesty, I really become alarmed," retorted Tania with a laugh. "There is something ridiculously false about this kind of talk."


    But then, the university's 600th anniversary is looming. Until 2009 its shoddiest Communist-era buildings, which mar Leipzig's otherwise delightful city center, will have to be replaced, including the tall pile of concrete slabs held up by the Marx relief.


    Something attractive has to be put in its place; one way or another, Ulbricht's cultural crime must be atoned for.


    What is it to be? A chapel resembling the one Ulbnricht murdered? A secular venue of academic celebrations (which have lost all of their splendor anyway in "unostentatious" new Germany, where students receive their diplomas by mail or may pick them up during business hours in some gray office)?


    "If there had been a decision to rebuild the church, we would have received ample donations," said Ulrich Stoetzner, the current head of the Paulinerverein, an association promoting the reconstruction. "A reconstruction would have cost roughly 25 million Euros (about $33 million). But who wants to donate money for a profane hall?"


    A faithful copy of the Paulinerkirche, as it would have probably been erected in any nation with a firmer sense of identity - Poland, for example -- seems out of the question, even though 70 percent of the sanctuary's interior and its original plans have been preserved and the location of its rubble at Leipzig's outskirts is known.


    But there is a chance that a design by Dutch architect Erick van Egeraat might yet be realized. Earlier this year, a jury headed by Leipzig's city planner chose it over several competitors. It envisions an interior almost identical to the original to be used both for church divine service and academic and other functions.


    Its huge and elegantly gabled façade would not exactly replicate its predecessor but resemble it strongly in a stylized fashion. It would, in Christ-like manner, appear to reach out to neighboring university building, as if to embrace them, while still be dwarfed by the "wisdom tooth," as Leipzigers call the giant university skyscraper next door.


    ......


    It will be fascinating to see which party of Germans will prevail. Will it be the party of the functionalists who seem embarrassed by all of the nation's history, and especially its Christian history, which it is politically incorrect to credit?


    Or will it be a fledgling movement that would like Germans to remember that there was more to their history than Hitler?


    As composer Krzysztoff Penderecki said, "Such a debate would be unthinkable in Poland." But then, as we said, Leipzig is not in Poland, even though in their architectural glory days in the 18th century, Poland and Saxony had the same sovereign, King Augustus the Strong.


    The long and short of this story is that Leipzig lies in the heart of Germany, a nation infuriatingly busy with its masochistic struggle for identity, a struggle that looks more and more insincere with each passing generation.


    In the words of Tania, the Bulgarian graduate, it has "degenerated to a fig-leaf for mediocrity and bad taste."

    Rekonstruktion bedeutet nicht unechten „Talmi-Flitter“, sondern Chance.


    a) Wäre dies der Fall, so wären z.B. Warschau und Danzig (aber auch z.B. Rothenburg ob der Tauber, das zu 40 % zerstört war!), unechte Kulissenstädte. Tatsächlich verwahren sie überaus eindrucksvoll das gesamteuropäisch-historische wie das polnische Denkmal- und Kulturerbe. So gesehen wurden diese überragenden Rekonstruktions-Leistungen nicht nur für Polen, sondern für uns alle als Europäer gebracht. Ähnliches gilt für das europäische Erbe der Frauenkirche und – hoffentlich – des Neumarkts in Dresden.
    b) Der deutsche Echtheits- und Authentizitäts-Wahn gleicht einer puristischen Prinzipienreiterei und überzeugt wenig als Gegenargument einer Rekonstruktion; Purismus gibt es als Gedankenspiel, nicht aber in der Lebenswirklichkeit. Im Ausland ist man sehr viel undogmatischer und pragmatischer – zu seinem Wohl. Vieles, was wir im Ausland bewundern, ist keineswegs „authentisch“, sondern im Laufe der Geschichte oft mehrmals rekonstruiert oder auch nachempfunden worden.


    c) Deutschland insgesamt ist wenig fähig, „weiche“ Wirtschaftsformen, wie z.B. Spielfilme, Unterhaltungsmusik, Mode, Touristik, savoir vivre, Geschmackskultur, zu entwickeln und wirtschaftlich erfolgreich zu exportieren, hier sind wir gegenüber Italien, Frankreich, ja Österreich scheinbar hoffnungslos im Hintertreffen. Diese mangelnde Geschmackskultur zeigt sich auch in der öffentlichen Ästhetik – und nicht zuletzt in der Rekonstruktionsdebatte. Andere Völker sind weiser – und gönnen sich das Schöne einfach (und leben auch noch gut davon). Die Deutschen suchen dieses sich Wohlfühlen folgerichtig im Ausland, etwa in pittoresken italienischen Altstädten oder in österreichischen Kaffeehäusern. Nachhause kehren wir zurück in die „Unwirtlichkeit unserer Städte“ (Alexander Mitscherlich) und gar in die „Gemordete Stadt“ (Wolf Jobst Siedler) – nehmen dies als unveränderbar hin und finden uns anscheinend resigniert damit ab! Wir verdienen es wohl nicht besser. Zeigt sich irgendwo ein bißchen Urbanität, wird diese überdankbar angenommen (Leipziger Innenstadt, Dresdener Neustadt, einige Straßen in Halle).


    d) Die deutschen Bewunderer spanischer, französischer, italienischer, tschechischer oder österreichischer Innenstädte lassen sich in Deutschland mit kruder ökonomisierter Funktionalität oder einem schematischen „postmodernen“ Modernismus um seiner selbst willen abspeisen, auf Kosten der Ästhetik. Die genannten Länder sind selbst Kulturstaaten, eine Bezeichnung, dessen wir uns immer so gerne rühmen, sofern sie nichts kostet. Aber Mailands große Passage wäre unter ökonomischen Sachzwängen niemals gebaut worden - und der heutige Fremdenverkehr profitiert immer noch davon. Der Freudenstädter Wiederaufbau, der Frankfurter Römer oder der wunderschön rekonstruierte Hildesheimer Marktplatz waren höchst umstritten. Seit langem sind sie sämtlich angenommen, alle sind froh darüber: zuerst die Bevölkerung selbst, dann die meisten Experten, und jeder ist eigentlich dafür gewesen – hinterher. Ähnlich wird es auch in Dresden, Potsdam und in anderen Städten sein.


    Es gibt kein wirklich überzeugendes Argument gegen eine Rekonstruktion.


    a) Kaum eines der immer wieder gegen die Rekonstruktion von Altem Rathaus und Waage vorgebrachten Argumente überzeugt: die „gewohnte Größe“ des jetzigen Marktplatzes (seit wann ist eine willkürlich geschehene Platzgröße als Folge eines Krieges ein Argument?), die vielen weiteren, noch zu rettenden Altbauruinen (wann hätten sich in der Vergangenheit viele Stimmen zur Rettung manchen Barockhauses erhoben, das dann doch abgerissen wurde?), das „fehlende Geld“ von Halle (es gab ärmere Städte, etwa in Italien oder Polen, die mutiger waren), die anderen Einrichtungen, die man dafür bauen oder erhalten könnte (damit würde j e d e s erdenkliche Vorhaben von vorn herein beiseite geschoben, denn solche Notwendigkeiten wird es immer geben). Zuweilen beschleicht einen sogar der Gedanke, in Deutschland scheue man unbewußt (?) in einer Art Selbstbestrafung davor zurück, Vergangenes, gerade wenn es besonders schön gewesen ist, wieder zu beleben. Als ob die verlorenen Kulturdenkmale Schuld an den deutschen politischen Versäumnissen und Verbrechen auf sich geladen hätten. Verlust oder neue Häßlichkeit als historisch gerechte Strafe.


    b) Die Gegenargumente greifen somit nicht: teils sind sie „Totschlagsargumente“, teils sind sie nicht nachvollziehbar, teils einfach nur vorgeschoben gegenüber einer fälligen ästhetischen Grundsatzentscheidung. Zeitgemäße Nutzungen sind auch in rekonstruierten Denkmalen stets möglich, nur Denkfaulheit sieht hier Hindernisse.



    Dr. iur. Michael Kilian
    Professor für Öffentliches Recht, Völker- und Europarecht
    an der Juristischen Fakultät der Universität Halle-Wittenberg
    Richter am LVG Sachsen-Anhalt a.D.


    Quelle:
    http://www.altes-rathaus-halle.de/dokumente_08.asp

    Central-Theater Esslingen


    Von Hermann Dorn


    Am 7. Mai fällt der Vorhang am Roßmarkt vorläufig zum letzten Mal. "Wegen Sanierung bis Oktober geschlossen", heißt es dann im ältesten Kino, das in Deutschland erhalten ist. Im Vorfeld haben Experten das Denkmal gründlich unter die Lupe genommen. So legte der Restaurator Hans Cabanis kurz vor Ostern ein Papier vor, das Hinweise für das künftige Farbkonzept liefert. Wichtigste Erkenntnis: "Ursprünglich prägten kräftige Blau- und Rottöne die Wände und die Decke des Central-Theaters. Einzelne Wandflächen wurden durch gemalte Rankenmuster mit Reliefvasen verziert", schreibt Cabanis. Er regt an, den Originalzustand wenigstens teilweise zu rekonstruieren.


    Die Studie bestätigt Annahmen, wie sie der Denkmalschützer Julius Fekete bereits vor Jahren in einem Aufsatz über das Central-Theater vertreten hat. Fekete ging davon aus, dass in den Zeiten der Schwarzweißfilme versucht worden ist, farbige Kontraste zu setzen. Während sich die Farben in den Schauspiel- und Opernhäusern auf der Bühne entfalten, mussten solche Effekte in der frühen Phase des Kinos von den Räumen ausgehen.




    Ältestes erhaltenes Kino
    Cabanis fügt dem Wissen über die herausragende Bedeutung des Central-Theaters einen weiteren Mosaikstein hinzu. Die Geschichte des Gebäudes und Kinos ist gut dokumentiert. 1629 wurde das Gebäude am Roßmarkt 9 als "Herberge zum Hammel" erstmals erwähnt. Bevor die einstigen Stallungen und Scheunen im Jahr 1913 in ein Kino umgebaut wurden, dienten sie ab 1850 vorübergehend als Brennerei und Bierbrauerei für das Gasthaus "Zum Goldenen Lamm".


    Die Wertschätzung der Denkmalschützer für das Kino, das seit einigen Jahren als Kulturtreff dient, drückt sich in stattlichen Zuschüssen für die geplante Sanierung aus. Sie steuern aus verschiedenen Töpfen zwei Drittel der Kosten bei, die auf insgesamt 300 000 Euro veranschlagt werden. Die entsprechenden Zusagen verdanken sich dem Umstand, dass das Central-Theater der ersten Phase angehört, in der Kinoarchitektur bewusst gestaltet worden ist. Zeugnisse dieser Kultur sind weitgehend verschwunden. Die wenigen Kinos, um die sich die Denkmalschützer kümmern, stammen aus den 1950er Jahren. In Baden-Württemberg kennen sie nur ein nennenswertes Lichtspielhaus aus der Zeit vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Es handelt sich um das 1926 in Mannheim erbaute Capitol.




    Erfolg für Denkmalschützer
    Die Sanierung krönt den Einsatz der Denkmalschützer für das Esslinger Kleinod. Ihnen ist es zu verdanken, dass das Central nach dem Aus für das letzte Kino am Ende der 80er Jahre nicht in eine Spielhalle umgebaut werden durfte. Nachdem diese Gefahr gebannt war, gelang es den Eigentümern zusammen mit dem Ehepaar Khinganskiy, das einstige Lichtspielhaus zu beleben und als Kulturtreff zu etablieren.
    .....


    Architekt Joachim Achenbacher hat die Vorgaben des Denkmalschutzes in seinem Konzept konsequent umgesetzt. Es sieht vor, alle Stile zu vereinen, die sich im Central-Theater niedergeschlagen haben - von den neoklassizistischen Stuckornamenten bis zum Kitsch der 50er Jahre. Achenbacher schwebt vor, die historische Entwicklung im Zuschauerraum aufzugreifen. Sie beginnt hinten mit dem Wandornamenten in den Orignalfarben. In den vorderen Sitzreihen verblassen die Töne immer mehr. Einen starken Eingriff wagt der Architekt vorne auf der Bühne: Dort plant er eine moderne Technik.

    Quelle:http://www.ez-online.de/lokal/…slingen/Artikel103590.cfm



    Bilder zur Innenarchitektur und Restaurierung des Central-Theaters:


    http://www.centraltheater-es.de/restaurierung.htm

    Architekteninitiative gegen Weltkulturerbestatus von Innsbruck


    INNSBRUCK-STADT.Gegen die Aufnahme Innsbrucks in die Liste des UNESCO-Weltkulturerbes bildete sich jetzt eine Architekteninitiative, mit dem Ziel, aus dem Aufnahmeverfahren wieder auszusteigen. Die Tiroler Architekten setzen sich zur Wehr, weil ihrer Ansicht nach die Gefahr eines Stillstandes in der Stadtentwicklung droht, da nur mehr "historisierendes Bauen" möglich sei (UNESCO-Weltkulturerbe-Konvention von 1972). Dieser Meinung äußerten Vertreter der Tiroler Architektenkammer, des Landesverbandes der Tiroler Architekten sowie des Architekturforums Tirol bei einer gemeinsamen Pressekonferenz. Gerade in den letzten Jahren befände sich Innsbruck auf einem guten Weg der Wiederbelebung der alten Stadt durch neue Architektur. Das gültige Denkmal- und Ortsbildschutzgesetz lasse auch Neues zu, doch Projekte wie das neue Innsbrucker Rathaus von Dominique Perrault oder die neue Bergiselschanze von Stararchitektin Zaha Hadid wären nach Meinung der Architekturinitiative mit dem Weltkulturerbe nicht möglich gewesen. So sehen es auch die Grünen und brachten im November einen dringlichen Antrag im Gemeinderat ein. Der Gemeinderat möge beschließen, dass "wegen der nachteiligen Auswirkungen auf die eigenverantwortliche Gestaltung der künftigen Stadtentwicklung die Aufnahme in die Liste des geschützten Weltkulturerbes weder betrieben noch gewünscht wird". Der Antrag der Grünen erhielt allerdings nicht die notwendige Zweidrittelmehrheit für seine Behandlung. Im Jänner soll der Antrag erneut eingebracht werden. Selbst Landeshauptmann Van Staa, in dessen Ära als Innsbrucker Bürgermeister der erste Brief im Jahr 2000 an die UNESCO geschickt wurde, erklärte unlängst öffentlich, nur die Hofkirche und Schloss Ambras als Weltkulturerbe schützen lassen zu wollen. Was die Grünen auch stört, ist die Art der Entscheidung, sich für das Weltkulturerbe zu bewerben. Der Gemeinderat war mit dieser Causa nie befasst, so der grüne Gemeinderat Gerhard Fritz, der vermutet, dass primär der Innsbrucker Tourismusverband am Prädikat Weltkulturerbe interessiert ist, ohne die Folgen für die Stadtentwicklung zu bedenken. (Quellen: Tiroler Tageszeitung, 03.12. u. 20.11.2004, APA-Meldung, 02.12.2004, Antrag der Grünen vom 18.11.2004)



    :gehtsnoch::gehtsnoch::gehtsnoch:


    Heute bin ich nach ein paar Jahren mal wieder durch Bregenz gefahren, und beim Anblick der meisten (durchgängig im Kastenstil und teils mitten in Altstadtensembles gesetzte) Neubauten komme ich zu der Vermutung, daß die österreichische Architektenszene die deutsche in Sachen Radikalität, Traditionsablehnung und Bauhaustreue noch bei weitem übertrifft. Der Bericht über Innsbruck entspricht dem Eindruck. Daß man sogar die Aufnahme ins Weltkulturerbe für die Ideologie zu opfern bereit ist, hätte ich bisher nicht für möglich gehalten.

    Zum Marktplatz gibt es Aktuelles:



    Ideen für die Marktplatz-Gestaltung gesucht
    Architekten und Lichtdesigner sollen Vorschläge liefern - Ziel ist flexible Nutzung des Rathaus-Vorplatzes
    Stuttgart (a) Zu den Sorgenkindern in der Landeshauptstadt gehört der Marktplatz. Das soll sich nun ändern. Die Stadt schreibt einen städtebaulichen Wettbewerb für den Platz vor dem Rathaus aus.
    Nach diesem sollen sich dreißig Architekturbüros Gedanken darüber machen, wie man den Marktplatz attraktiver gestalten kann, damit er insbesondere am Abend und nachts besser angenommen wird. Der Ausschuss für Umwelt und Technik soll sich heute mit dem Beschlussantrag für den Wettbewerb, der etwa 86 000 Euro kostet, beschäftigen. Sofern der Gemeinderat grünes Licht gibt, könnten Ende September die Ergebnisse des Wettbewerbs vorliegen.
    Für die Planer wird dies sicherlich keine leichte Aufgabe, zumal die Erwartungen hoch gesteckt und die Einschränkungen vielfältiger Art sind: Der 100 mal 65 Meter große Platz, unter dem sich nach wie vor ein Bunker befindet, der nicht angetastet werden darf, muss für die Wochenmärkte, für Weihnachtsmarkt und Weindorf frei gehalten werden. Eine Einbeziehung des ehemaligen Bunkerhotels in die Planungsüberlegungen sei zur Zeit aus verschiedenen Gründen nicht sinnvoll. Im Rahmen des Wettbewerbs könnten allenfalls Überlegungen über eine Platzgestaltung ohne Bunker als Alternativen dargestellt werden. Lediglich vor dem Rathaus und vor dem Herrenbekleidungsgeschäft Breitling sind gewisse Eingriffe denkbar. So könnten allenfalls die Baumgruppe mit dem Thouret-Brunnen und der dortige Taxistand verlagert werden. Die Stadt möchte dem zentralen Ort wieder mehr Bedeutung verleihen. Das Städtebau-Referat stellt sich eine flexible Nutzung, eine gesteigerte Aufenthaltsqualität und eine bessere Vernetzung mit dem Umfeld vor. Dies bedeutet, dass die Architekten in ihre Entwürfe die angrenzenden Seitenstraßen einbeziehen sollen.
    Die Planer werden dabei in erster Linie mit Licht und Design spielen müssen. Ziel des Wettbewerbs ist es, dem Marktplatz, der sich zur Zeit weit unter Wert präsentiert, wieder eine qualitätsvolle eigenständige Form und Funktion zu geben. Dabei soll mit möglichst einfachen Mitteln eine Aufwertung des Platzes erreicht werden.
    Die Rede ist von flexiblen Nutzungen. Darunter sind vor allem weitere Straßencafs zu verstehen, die die Märkte aber nicht blockieren dürfen. Das Caf Scholz hat bereits in diese Richtung einen Anfang gemacht und den Platz etwas belebt, aber es ist noch allein auf weiter Flur. Die Münzstraße soll zur reinen Andienungszone umgestaltet werden.

    Quelle: Esslinger Zeitung


    Anm.: Ich hoffe, die "Lichtdesigner" richten nicht allzuviel ausgeflippten Unfug an, bedauerlich auch, daß man gar nicht erst an eine Bürgerbeteiligung in Sachen Platzgestaltung denkt.

    Die Hauptpost befand sich in der heutigen Bolzstraße, gegenüber dem alten Bahnhof (heute Metropol). Dort entsteht demnächst das Stilwerk.
    Das Ensemble Ecke Reinsburgstraße/Hasenbergsteige bzw. Johann-Sebastian-Bach Platz besteht heute zum Glück noch nahezu unverändert.
    Besonders schade ist es um den Großen Bazar, die Fassaden waren weitestgehend erhalten, heute steht hier der Wittwer und Gebäude auf kleineren Parzellen.
    Der neue Olgabau wurde wenigstens in akzeptablem, wenn auch ungleich bescheidenerem traditionallen Stil der Stuttgarter Schule neu gebaut.
    Das Hotel Silber wäre gut rekonstruierbar, aber als ehemaliges Hauptquartier der Gestapo würde da wohl mancher sofort Einwände haben (obwohl das Gebäude ja nichts für diese mißbräuchliche Nutzung kann).
    Der Wilhelmsbau wäre ein hervorragendes Projekt für eine Fassadenrekonstruktion, nichts spricht dagegen. Dieselben "Modernisierungsaktionen" hat man bei einigen anderen Gebäuden in der Innenstadt betrieben, wie ich im letzten post bereits schrieb.
    Der Schwabtunnel existiert noch unverändert.
    An der Hauptstätterstraße hat zumindest die schöne Häuserzeile zum Bohnenviertel den Krieg überstanden, sie kommt direkt an der Stadtautobahn nur leider bisher kaum zur Geltung. Aber gerade dieser Bereich soll ja in den nächsten Jahren zurückgebaut und für Fußgänger attraktiver gemacht werden.


    Danke für die Bilder :)

    Darauf bin ich auch sehr gespannt :D
    In das Stadtarchiv werde ich auch demnächst mal gehen.
    Mich interessieren dabei besonders die Vorkriegsfassaden einiger historischer Gebäude in der Königstrasse, die heute -da "modernisiert"- kaum wiederzuerkennen sind (Salamanderbau, WMF-Haus u.a.) In welcher Form sind alte Fotografien dort erhältlich?

    Ein Glückwunsch zur Rettung des Admiralspalasts


    Von Johannes Heesters


    Mit großer Freude habe ich davon gehört, dass der Admiralspalast an der Berliner Friedrichstraße gerettet ist. Das schöne alte Haus soll aufwendig saniert werden, unter den später eingezogenen Wänden und Zwischendecken müssen herrliche Stuckornamente verborgen sein, an die ich mich noch gut erinnere. Ab 2006, so erfahre ich, soll dort auf der Bühne wieder gespielt werden. Nur ein lebendiges Theater ist ein gutes Theater. Schon allein, dass in Berlin in der heutigen Zeit ein Theater wieder eröffnet wird, ist ein Grund zur Freude. Eigentlich fast ein Wunder.
    ....


    http://www.tagesspiegel.de/ber…4.03.2005/1680817.asp#art